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The RBC Blood Group Antigen System

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ABO-incompatible Organ Transplantation

Abstract

In this chapter, some of the human blood group systems and their specific antigens are discussed. The human blood group system is classified by erythrocyte antigens, and the antigenic determinant of erythrocyte can cause an immune response. The immune responses in blood type incompatible organ transplantation are mainly caused by the ABO antigen expression in the surface of tissue cell, so the ABO blood group antigens are considered in more detail. Rh, Duffy, Kell, and MN systems will also be described in this chapter.

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Correspondence to Xiaopeng Hu .

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Hu, X., Zhang, Z., Zeng, S. (2019). The RBC Blood Group Antigen System. In: Wang, Y. (eds) ABO-incompatible Organ Transplantation. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3399-6_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3399-6_2

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-13-3398-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-13-3399-6

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