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Post-Combustion Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry

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CO2 Separation, Purification and Conversion to Chemicals and Fuels

Part of the book series: Energy, Environment, and Sustainability ((ENENSU))

Abstract

Post-combustion CO2 capture as a form of carbon capture and storage (CCS) is currently the most promising technology to reduce CO2 emissions from the conversion of fossil fuels. Currently, in the form of amine scrubbing, it exists at the commercial scale; a number of other CCS technologies also exist at the commercial or near-commercial scale, in the form of pre-combustion capture from gasification processes, oxy-fuel combustion for CO2 separation, and chemical and calcium looping. While the utility market is an evident focus of CCS technology, there are some doubts about whether or not this market will be largely dominated, in the next several decades, by renewable generation and the mass enrolment of energy storage devices, or if CCS technologies will be utilized to balance the supply–demand gap. However, there remain numerous opportunities in the industrial sector for CCS technology to contribute to reducing CO2 emissions. These opportunities include well-known industries such as cement and steel as well as sectors like marine transport. This chapter will evaluate the available technologies and focus on the many opportunities that now exist in the industrial sector for CCS.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge Professor V. Manovic (Cranfield University, UK) for a number of valuable discussions regarding CCS and its fuel flexibility, economics and applications in the steel industry.

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Correspondence to P. T. Clough .

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Anthony, E.J., Clough, P.T. (2019). Post-Combustion Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry. In: Winter, F., Agarwal, R., Hrdlicka, J., Varjani, S. (eds) CO2 Separation, Purification and Conversion to Chemicals and Fuels. Energy, Environment, and Sustainability. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3296-8_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3296-8_4

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