Skip to main content

Nouvelle Vague

  • 164 Accesses

Abstract

In reference to the “Nouvelle Vague” (“New Wave”) of the late 1950s film makers in France, the leadership selected at the 14th Zengakuren convention in the spring of 1959 came to be called the New Wave of the student movement. (I think it was Mainichi Shimbun social issues reporter Masahiro Yoshino, who often came to the Zengakuren office in those days, who first began using the term “nouvelle vague.” He was about ten years older than I, but Karōji and I would go out drinking with him and we would talk about films. He was a fan of Jeanne Moreau , who starred in “Jules and Jim.” Quite a few years later, at Katase Enoshima station on the Odakyū Line, he reprimanded the behavior of some hot-rodder gang members and was beaten to death by a metal chain. It pained me to learn of his death. This was the kind of fervent person he was.) Until then members of the Communist Party, who were practically activists by occupation, had led the Zengakuren. In contrast, the new officers were from the new generation unencumbered by politics. Our average age was just over 21. This shift toward younger leadership was the brilliant idea of Shigeo Shima , the secretary general of the Bund.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-13-2757-5_5
  • Chapter length: 3 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   54.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-13-2757-5
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   69.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    I think it was Mainichi Shimbun social issues reporter Masahiro Yoshino, who often came to the Zengakuren office in those days, who first began using the term “nouvelle vague.” He was about ten years older than I, but Karōji and I would go out drinking with him and we would talk about films. He was a fan of Jeanne Moreau , who starred in “Jules and Jim.” Quite a few years later, at Katase Enoshima station on the Odakyū Line, he reprimanded the behavior of some hot-rodder gang members and was beaten to death by a metal chain. It pained me to learn of his death. This was the kind of fervent person he was.

  2. 2.

    This coffee shop later closed. But from what I hear the employees bought the furniture and opened a shop with the same menu across from the front gate of the University of Tokyo. I dropped by when I was at Tōdai for a seminar recently. The nostalgic flavor of the curry rice was the same, but the price was 950 yen. Does this mean that the consumer price index has risen ten times in the last half-century? The layout of the store was much smaller than the long building with a courtyard in our day, and it no longer seemed to be a fitting space for plotting “revolutionary conspiracies.”

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2018 The Author(s)

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Aoki, M. (2018). Nouvelle Vague. In: Transboundary Game of Life. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2757-5_5

Download citation