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Sugamo Prison and Anti-security Treaty Struggle

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Abstract

For two weeks after I was arrested at Haneda Airport in January 1960, I was detained at the police station at Akihabara, Tokyo. As I had maintained my silence, the attending prosecutor, perhaps to teach me a lesson, sent me to Sugamo Prison. This was where Richard Sorge of the Sorge espionage incident and Hideki Tōjō and other A-level war criminals were imprisoned and executed. Nobusuke Kishi had also been detained there as a war criminal. Now it was my turn, as I had opposed his politics. Now a skyscraper called Sunshine City has been built on that spot.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-13-2757-5_10
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Notes

  1. 1.

    One such example is the following comment made by former Nomura Securities Chairman Setsuya Tabuchi in his “My Memoir.” “I read Mr. Masahiko Aoki’s memoir with interest. I am someone who is the opposite of those following communism, but I agreed with him in viewing the 1960 ‘Japan-U.S. Security Treaty’ as a symbolic incident. Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi was attempting to rule postwar Japan using the means of state capitalism that ruled former Manchukuo” (Nihon Keizai Shimbun, November 1, 2007).

  2. 2.

    Although I was not in Japan at the time, the Zenkyōtō movement a decade later broke free from progressive mythology and revolutionary illusion to raise protests against the state of universities considered the norm up until that time. In that regard, it may be said to have been an even more fundamentally radical reform movement.

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Aoki, M. (2018). Sugamo Prison and Anti-security Treaty Struggle. In: Transboundary Game of Life. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2757-5_10

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