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Applications of Geomembrane Cutoff Walls in Remediation of Contaminated Sites

  • Xuede QianEmail author
  • Zhonghua Zheng
  • Zhi Guo
  • Changqing Qi
  • Liqi Liu
  • Yong Liu
  • Shengli Zhen
  • Shiwen Ding
  • Jing Jin
  • Yang Wang
  • Yimin Ge
Conference paper
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

A composite cutoff wall consisting of HDPE geomembrane combined with soil-bentonite backfill can be effectively applied to site remediation projects. This technique was firstly successfully applied by Beijing GeoEnviron Engineering & Technology, Inc. (BGE) in a copper-containing acidic liquid leakage project in China in 2011. Then, BGE successfully applied and promoted this technique in many other projects in recent 7 years. Some specific key sealing materials were developed to achieve the effective bonding between geomembrane and bedrock and clay aquifers. In addition, a special machine for installing geomembranes was also designed. The maximum geomembrane inserting depth on site reached to 32 m. Geomembrane composite cutoff wall is considered to be currently the safest and most effective vertical barrier technique to block horizontal pollution migration.

Keywords

HDPE geomembrane Vertical barrier Interlock Key-in 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuede Qian
    • 1
    Email author
  • Zhonghua Zheng
    • 2
  • Zhi Guo
    • 2
  • Changqing Qi
    • 2
  • Liqi Liu
    • 2
  • Yong Liu
    • 2
  • Shengli Zhen
    • 2
  • Shiwen Ding
    • 2
  • Jing Jin
    • 2
  • Yang Wang
    • 2
  • Yimin Ge
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan Department of Environmental QualityLansingUSA
  2. 2.Beijing GeoEnviron Engineering & Technology, Inc.BeijingChina

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