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Elite Capture in Decentralised Institutions: A Literature Survey

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Abstract

Decentralised governance has been seen as an important platform that facilitates better decision-making at the level of local government. It is also an experiment in the devolution of powers to the government at the regional level by different countries, particularly developing ones, such as India, where the decentralisation experiment has been termed successful (Besley et al. 2006).

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Decentralisation and DevelopmentInstitute for Social and Economic Change (ISEC)BengaluruIndia

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