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A Partnership Journey Narrative: The Case of Damtru, Science Teacher Educator

  • Mellita JonesEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter depicts the journey of establishing and enacting a particular partnership arrangement. It details the roles of lecturer, teacher, pre-service teacher, and school children in the different stages of partnership practice to illustrate how the partnership was established, maintained, and evaluated. The narrative style takes the reader on a journey through the considerations, decisions, and experiences of being involved in a university–school partnership arrangement. The purpose of such a narrative is to provide a rich depiction of how a partnership is “lived” by its various actors. This depiction should enhance the reader’s capacity to both interpret and apply the Interpretive Framework set out in this book to his or her own partnership practice, as well as gain some insights into the value and challenges inherent in partnership practices from the perspectives of those involved.

Keywords

Partnerships Teacher education Pre-service teachers Teachers Science teacher educators 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Catholic UniversityBallaratAustralia

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