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Hearing Loss in Prisoners Policy Challenges

  • Louise Sinden-CarrollEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In Chap.  1, the marginalization of prisoners with hearing loss was identified as the issue for research. Then, the research aim and design were outlined and the New Zealand prison environment and the policy maker’s probable response to this research were defined.

References

  1. Action on Hearing Loss, United Kingdom. (2010). Statistics. Retrieved from: http://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/your-hearing/about-deafness-and-hearing-loss/statistics.aspx.
  2. Bowers, M. (1981). Hearing impairment in prisoners. Deafness Research Foundation, Dilworth Clinic, Remuera Road, Auckland.Google Scholar
  3. Dahl, M. (2002). Under-identification of hearing loss in the Canadian federal inmate population. Retrieved from: http://www.cscscc.gc.ca/publications/forum/e062/062e_e.pdf.
  4. Department of Corrections. (2015). Department of corrections. Retrieved from: www.corrections.govt.nz.
  5. Ministry of Health. (2005). Results from the prisoner health survey. Retrieved from: http://www.health.govt.nz.
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  7. Stanley, E. (2011). Human rights and prisons, a review to the human rights commission. Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand, ISBN: 978-0-478-34998-6 (Online), Retrieved from: https://www.hrc.co.nz/files/5214/2550/8357/Stanley_2011_-_Human_Rights_and_Prisons.pdf.
  8. Stuff.co.nz. (2014). Spring Hill prison riot costs $10 m. Retrieved from: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/10099700/Spring-Hill-prison-riot-costs-10m.
  9. World Health Organization. (2015). Deafness and hearing loss. Retrieved from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs300/en/.

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NGO Services LimitedAucklandNew Zealand

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