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Transition Supports and Barriers to “Staying Out”

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Incarcerated Youth Transitioning Back to the Community
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Abstract

In this concluding chapter, an overview of the extant research on supports and barriers to the successful transition of young people returning to the community is provided. The supports and barriers discussed in the international chapters in Part 2 of the book are also included in this overview. The chapter concludes with implications for practice and future research. Connections are made to the Taxonomy for Transition Programming 2.0, where relevant.

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O’Neill, S.C. (2018). Transition Supports and Barriers to “Staying Out”. In: O’Neill, S. (eds) Incarcerated Youth Transitioning Back to the Community. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-0752-2_16

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