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The Prior Life Experiences of Refugee Youth

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Abstract

The chapter focuses on the pre-settlement educational experiences and aspirations of refugee background youth . It highlights the need to understand the highly differentiated prior life experiences of refugee background students. Despite having faced similar experiences, such as conflict and prolonged displacement, each refugee background student has dealt with different circumstances. Data for the chapter is drawn from both the major study recounted in this book, as well as a later study examining educational aspirations and expectations of those with approved United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) refugee status who remain offshore, awaiting their resettlement to host countries . This chapter gives voice to refugee youth attending Australian universities, drawing on personal stories and vignettes to capture their heterogeneous prior life experiences, and their educational experiences and aspirations.

Keywords

  • Prior Life Experiences
  • Recourse
  • Refugee Background Students
  • resettlementResettlement
  • countriesCountries

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Loshini Naidoo .

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Naidoo, L., Wilkinson, J., Adoniou, M., Langat, K. (2018). The Prior Life Experiences of Refugee Youth. In: Refugee Background Students Transitioning Into Higher Education. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-0420-0_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-0420-0_4

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