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Setting the Context

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Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to consider particular elements of the larger context for the development of refugee education and within that larger context to explore a review of the literature. Context is not just the background against which refugee experiences occur; it is a collection of determining forces that affect the refugee experience in delicate and not-so-delicate ways. The context or setting, and the responses it engenders, can be challenging, and shapes forces that drive and mediate the personal experiences of refugees which will be explored in later chapters.

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Correspondence to Loshini Naidoo .

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Naidoo, L., Wilkinson, J., Adoniou, M., Langat, K. (2018). Setting the Context. In: Refugee Background Students Transitioning Into Higher Education. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-0420-0_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-0420-0_1

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