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Developing Creativity in Science: The Case of Vygotsky

  • Manolis Dafermos
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives in Cultural-Historical Research book series (PCHR, volume 4)

Abstract

The chapter explores the enigma of creativity in science on the basis of the study of Vygotsky’s case. The chapter proposes the examination of several shifts in contemporary creativity research focusing on the need to develop a dialectical framework. Vygotsky’s life course and the development of his theory are examined as a unique case of creativity in science that should be investigated in a broader social and historical context. Vygotsky’s creative development is a complex, multidimensional, dynamic phenomena. The chapter discusses several facets of Vygotsky’s creative development: the links between the social commitment and the production of new knowledge, the relations between the crises and creativity, the potential for a critical dialogue, the significance of collaborative, shared action, the significance of the unity of theory and social practice, the interrelations between classic and romantic science, the role of the images of the future for social and scientific change.

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CreteRethymnonGreece

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