The Primary Appearance of Cultural-Historical Psychology

Chapter
Part of the Perspectives in Cultural-Historical Research book series (PCHR, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter turns to the period of the primary appearance of cultural-historical theory. The study of the role of sign mediating activity in the cultural development of higher mental functions marks the primary appearance of cultural-historical theory. Cultural development was examined by Vygotsky as a distinct line of development in relation to biological-evolutionary development. Vygotsky and his colleagues developed an experimental-genetic method for the investigation of the development of higher mental functions. Establishing a concrete human psychology in terms of drama served as a way for the theoretical and methodological refoundation of psychology as a discipline.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CreteRethymnonGreece

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