Advertisement

Exploring the Philosophical Underpinnings of Cultural-Historical Theory

  • Manolis Dafermos
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives in Cultural-Historical Research book series (PCHR, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter explores the philosophical underpinnings of cultural-historical theory. More precisely, this chapter traces the philosophical roots of Vygotsky’s theory by focusing mainly on the philosophical ideas of Spinoza, Hegel, Feuerbach, and Marx. Vygotsky found the roots of the crisis in psychology in the failure of Cartesian dualism that was the dominant tendency in the domain of psychology. He was looking for a philosophical theory which allows a radically new look at the key theoretical, methodological, and practical issues raised in psychology as a discipline.

References

  1. Akselrod, L. (1927). Nadoelo! [Enough!]. Krasnaja nov [Red Virgin Soil], 3, 171–181.Google Scholar
  2. Akselrod, L. (1952). Spinoza and materialism. In G. L. Kline (Ed.), Spinoza in Soviet philosophy (pp. 61–89). New York: Humanities Press.Google Scholar
  3. Asmolov, A. G. (1998). Vygotsky today: On the verge of nonclassical psychology. Commack, New York: Nova Science Publishers Inc.Google Scholar
  4. Bakhurst, D. (2007). Vygotsky’s Demons. In H. Daniels, M. Cole, & J. Wertsch (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to Vygotsky (pp. 50–76). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Blunden, A. (2009). From where did Vygotsky get his Hegelianism? Retrieved August 10, 2017, from http://home.mira.net/~andy/works/vygotskys-hegelianism.htm.
  6. Blunden, A. (2010). An interdisciplinary theory of activity. Leiden: Brill Academic Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bruner, J. (1987). Prologue to the English edition. In R. Rieber, & A. Carton (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 1, pp. 1–16). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  8. Bykova, M. F. (2013). Will and freedom. In A. de Laurentiis & J. Edwards (Eds.), The Bloomsbury companion to Hegel (pp. 265–269). New York: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.Google Scholar
  9. Deborin, A. M. (1923). Liudvih Feierbah. Lischnost i mirovossrenie [Ludwig Feuerbach. personality and worldview]. Moscow, Leningrad: Materialist.Google Scholar
  10. Deborin, A. (2006). Spinoza’s world view. Retrieved August 15, 2017, from http://www.autodidactproject.org/other/deborin-spinoza.html.
  11. Derry, J. (2013). Vygotsky philosophy and education. Oxford: Willey Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Elhammoumi, M. (2012). Marxist psychology: A research paradigm whose time has come. Estudos de Psicologia (Campinas), 29(1), 3–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Feigenberg, I. M. (1996). L. S. Vygotsky: The way he started: S.F. Dobkin’s Memoirs. Jerusalem: Jerusalem Publishing Center.Google Scholar
  14. Feuerbach, L. (2008). The essence of Christianity (Eliot, G., Trans.). Walnut: MSAC Philosophy Group.Google Scholar
  15. Friedrich, J. (2014). Vygotsky’s idea of psychological tools. In A. Yasnitsky, R. van der Veer, & M. Ferrari (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of cultural-historical psychology (pp. 47–62). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hegel, G. W. F. (1840). Outline of Hegel’s phenomenology. Retrieved August 20, 2017, from https://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/hegel/olpindex.htm.
  17. Hegel, G. W. F. (1896). Lectures on the history of philosophy (Vol. III) (E. S. Haldane & F. H. Simson, Trans.). London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.Google Scholar
  18. Hegel, G. W. F. (1988). Aesthetics: Lectures on fine art (T. M. Knox,Trans.) (Vol. 1). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Hegel, G. W. F. (1991). Encyclopaedia of philosophical sciences (part 1) (T. F. Geraets, W. A. Suchting, & H. S. Harris, Trans.). Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  20. Hegel, G. W. F. (2001). The philosophy of history (J., Sibree, Trans.). Kitchener, Ontario: Batoche Books.Google Scholar
  21. Hegel, G. W. F. (2004). Phenomenology of spirit (A. V. Miller, Trans.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Hegel, G. W. F. (2007). Philosophy of mind. In M. J. Inwood (Ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Ilyenkov, E. (2009). The ideal in human activity. In Marxists internet archive dialectical logic, essays on its history and theory. Pacifica: Marxists Internet Archive.Google Scholar
  24. Jantzen, W. (2009). The problem of the will in the late work of Vygotsky and Leont’ev’s solution to this problem. Human Ontogenetics, 3(2), 51–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Jones, P. (2011). Fundamental issues in cultural-historical research: the Marxist connection. The paper was presented at AFIRSE in Piauí, Brazil. Retrieved August 15, 2017, from https://www.academia.edu/8417253/Fundamental_issues_in_cultural-historical_research_the_Marxist_connection.
  26. Keiler, P. (2003). “What Is absolutely impossible for one person, Is possible for Two”. Annotations on some Feuerbachian elements in the later works of L. S. Vygotsky. The paper presented at the XIth European conference on developmental psychology. Milan, August 27–31. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from http://www.ich-sciences.de/media/texte/keiler_2005.pdf.
  27. Kotik-Friedgut, B., & Friedgut, T. H. (2008). A man of his country and his time: Jewish influences on Lev Semionovich Vygotsky’s world view. History of Psychology, 11(1), 15–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Kozulin, A. (1990). Vygotsky’s psychology. A biography of ideas. Cambridge & Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Kravtsov, G. G., & Kravtsova, E. E. (2014). The projective method as the basis of continuous education. In A. Blunden (Ed.), Collaborative projects: An interdisciplinary study (pp. 41–58). Leiden, Boston. Brill.Google Scholar
  30. Laudan, L. (1977). Progress and its problems: Towards a theory of scientific growth. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press.Google Scholar
  31. Maidansky, A. (2003). The Russian Spinozists. Studies in East European Thought, 55(3), 199–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Marx, K. (1867). Preface to the first German edition. Capital (Vol. I). Retrieved August 15, 2017, from http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/p1.htm.
  33. Marx, K. (1875). Critique of the Gotha programme. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1875/gotha/index.htm.
  34. Marx, K. (1975). Economic and philosophic manuscripts of 1844. In K. Marx, & F. Engels, Collected Works (Vol. 3, pp. 229–348). Moscow: Progress Publisher.Google Scholar
  35. Marx, K. (1976). Capital. A Critique of political economy. London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  36. Marx, K., & Engels, F. (1956). The Holy family or critique of critical critique. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House.Google Scholar
  37. Packer, M. (2008). Is Vygotsky Relevant? Vygotsky’s Marxist psychology. Mind, Culture, Activity, 15(1), 8–31.Google Scholar
  38. Patelis, D. (1995). Marxismos [Marxism]. In T. Hiotakis & E. Horafas (Eds.), Philosophiko kai koinoniologiko lexiko [Philosophical-sociological dictionary] (Vol. 3, pp. 246–248). Athens: Kappopoulos.Google Scholar
  39. Plekhanov, G. (1905). Translator’s preface to the second edition of Engels’ Ludwig Feuerbach and the end of classical German philosophy. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from https://www.marxists.org/archive/plekhanov/1905/preface-theses.htm.
  40. Radzikhovsky, L. A. (1993). Notes in english edition. In R. W. Rieber, & A. S. Carton (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 2, pp. 375–386.). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  41. Robbins, D. (1999). Prologue. In R. Richer, & A. Carton (Eds.), The collected works of Vygotsky (Vol. 6, pp. v–xxii). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  42. Scribner, S. (1985). Vygotsky’s uses of history. In J. V. Wertsch (Ed.), Culture, communication, and cognition (pp. 119–145). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  43. Spinoza, B. (2002a). Ethics. In B. Spinoza, Complete works (S. Shirley, Trans.) (pp. 213–382). Indianapolis, Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.Google Scholar
  44. Spinoza, B. (2002b). Letter 58. In B. Spinoza, Complete works (S. Shirley, Trans.) (pp. 908–910). Indianapolis, Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.Google Scholar
  45. Toassa, G. (2014). Creating a materialistic psychology—sources and influence of Spinoza in Vygotsky’s works. International Journal of Liberal Arts and Social Science, 2(5), 83–94.Google Scholar
  46. Van der Veer, R., & Valsiner, J. (1991). Understanding Vygotsky. A quest for synthesis. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  47. Veresov, N. (1999). Undiscovered Vygotsky. Frankfurt am Main and New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  48. Veresov, N. (2005). Marxist and non-Marxist aspects of the cultural-historical psychology of L. S. Vygotsky. Outlines, 1, 31–49.Google Scholar
  49. Veresov, N. (2014). Refocusing the lens on development: Towards genetic research methodology. In M. Fleer, & A. Ridgway (Eds.), Visual methodologies and digital tools for researching with young children (pp. 129–149). Springer.Google Scholar
  50. Vygodskaya, G. L., & Lifanova, T. M. (1999). Lev Semenovich Vygotsky. Part 1. Journal of Russian and Eastern European Psychology, 37(2), 13–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Vygotsky, L. (1987). Psychologia Iskusstva [Psychology of Art]. Moscow: Pedagogika.Google Scholar
  53. Vygotsky, L. S. (1989). Concrete human psychology. An unpublished manuscript by Vygotsky. Soviet Psychology, 27(2), 53–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Vygotsky, L. S. (1993). Introduction to E.A. Gracheva’s book “The education and instruction of severely retarded children”. In R. W. Rieber, & A. S. Carton (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 2, pp. 212–219). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  55. Vygotsky, L. (1994). The socialist alteration of man. In R. van der Veer & J. Valsiner (Eds.), Vygotsky reader (pp. 175–184). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  56. Vygotsky, L. S. (1997a). The historical meaning of the crisis of psychology. In R. Rieber, & J. Wolloc (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 3, pp. 233–344). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  57. Vygotsky, L. S. (1997b). The history and development of higher mental functions. In R. W. Reiber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 4, pp. 1–252). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  58. Vygotsky, L. (1997c). Consciousness as a problem for the psychology of behavior. In R. W. Reiber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 3, pp. 63–79). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  59. Vygotsky, L. S. (1997d). The instrumental method in psychology. In R. Rieber, & J. Wolloc (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 3, pp. 85–89). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  60. Vygotsky, L. (1997e). On psychological systems. In R. Rieber, & J. Wolloc (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 3, pp. 91–107). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  61. Vygotsky, L. (1998). The pedology of the adolescent. In R. Rieber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 5, pp. 3–186). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  62. Vygotsky, L. (1999a). Tool and sign in the development of child. In R. Rieber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol.6, pp. 1–70). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  63. Vygotsky, L. (1999b). The teaching about emotions. Historical-psychological studies (pp. 71–235). In R. Rieber (Ed.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 6, pp. 63–79). New York, London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  64. Vygotsky, L. S., & Luria, A. R. (1993). Etyudy po istorii povedeniya: Obez’yana, primi- tiv, rebenok [Essays in the history of behaviour: Ape, primitive, and child]. Moscow: Pedagogika-Press.Google Scholar
  65. Yaroshevsky, M. G., & Gurgenidze, G. S. (1997). Epilogue. In R. W. Rieber, & J. Wollock (Eds.), The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (Vol. 3, pp. 345–370). New York, London: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CreteRethymnonGreece

Personalised recommendations