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Persuasive Multimedia Application for Children Readiness Towards Circumcision

  • Raudzatul Fathiyah Mohd Said
  • Norzilah MusaEmail author
  • Norzehan Sakamat
  • Noorazida Mohd Idris
Conference paper

Abstract

Nowadays, there are many educational software products that have incorporated motivational factors for assisting parents and teachers in persuading, convincing and motivating children to change their existing perception or behaviour. Different combinations of persuasive approaches work with different children, as verbal persuasive alone is not sufficient in changing children’s behaviour. The lack of existing applications to assist parents in persuading boys to undertake the circumcision procedure has motivated this study. A survey was conducted in order to determine the factors that might influence children to undergo circumcision. Rasch Measurement Model is used for validating and analysing the collected data. Results from this analysis are used for designing a knowledge management framework, which in turn will be used as a base for developing a multimedia prototype called BraveBoy. The strength of this framework is in its combination of different knowledge sources on circumcision procedures for boys, blended with various persuasive techniques to form an effective strategy.

Keywords

Circumcision Knowledge management Rasch Multimedia application Persuasive 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Universiti Teknologi MARA and Ministry of Education, Malaysia [600-RMI/DANA5/3/LESTARI(76/2015)] for the financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raudzatul Fathiyah Mohd Said
    • 1
  • Norzilah Musa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Norzehan Sakamat
    • 1
  • Noorazida Mohd Idris
    • 1
  1. 1.Pusat Asasi, Universiti Teknologi MARA Cawangan SelangorKampus DengkilMalaysia

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