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The Use of Wolbachia by the World Mosquito Program to Interrupt Transmission of Aedes aegypti Transmitted Viruses

  • Scott L. O’Neill
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1062)

Abstract

The biological control of mosquito transmission by the use of the naturally occurring insect-specific bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia has been successfully tested in small field trials. The approach has been translated successfully to larger field sites in Townsville, Australia and expanded to more than 10 countries through the Eliminate Dengue Program. The broader application of the program beyond limiting the transmission of dengue and including other Aedes aegypti borne mosquitoes has seen the program growing into a global not-for-profit initiative to be known as the World Mosquito Program.

Keywords

World Mosquito Program Biological mosquito control Cytoplasmic Incompatibility wMel Wolbachia strain Randomised control cluster trial 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute Vector Borne DiseaseMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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