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Continuing Labour Unrest, Efficiency Enhancing Schemes and Improvements in Labour Productivity During the Late 1920s

  • Chikayoshi Nomura
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

While the Government of India’s decision to adopt tariff protection in the mid-1920s provided the Tata Iron and Steel Company (TISCO) with an opportunity to stabilize its financial situation, the same decision required the company to further reorganize its labour management system in order to improve labour productivity, but the subsequent efforts at the same led to the company’s worst bout with labour unrest ever, beginning in 1927.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Literature and Human SciencesOsaka City UniversityOsakaJapan

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