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The Financial Crisis of the 1920s, the Introduction of Tariff Protection and “Imperial Commitment”

  • Chikayoshi Nomura
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

The 1920s were a harsh and difficult decade for the Tata Iron and Steel Company (TISCO) in terms of not only continuous labour unrest, the topic of the previous and next chapters, but also severe price deflation that began in 1921, the latter, the subject of the present chapter, marked by a worldwide decline in prices after the post-war economic boom, which became more pronounced in the Indian context.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Literature and Human SciencesOsaka City UniversityOsakaJapan

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