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Initial Failure to Produce Competitive Steel, Capitalization Problems and the Institution of an Internal Financing System

  • Chikayoshi Nomura
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

With the help of steadily progressing institutional settings and government assistance, the Tatas were able to establish India’s first indigenous capital-financed iron and steel enterprise during the first decade of the 20th century.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Literature and Human SciencesOsaka City UniversityOsakaJapan

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