Introduction

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

The determining factors and process of the growth of modern business corporations are two of the most salient topics for historians studying the development of modern economies. Corporate growth requires that transformations occur in such areas as technology, production equipment and facilities, human resource skills and knowledge, managerial capacity, marketing networks, as well as, relationships among upstream and downstream industries; and the overall success of these transformations leads to impressive rises in the productivity of individual firms, which forms the backbone of the development of modern economies.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Literature and Human SciencesOsaka City UniversityOsakaJapan

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