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Self-regulatory Practices: Key Aspects of Learning for Student Teachers on Practicum

  • Lyn McDonald
Chapter

Abstract

The role the visiting lecturer plays in promoting and supporting student teacher learning on practicum is an important one in Initial Teacher Education (ITE). A central argument of this chapter is that student teacher learning is not simply focussed on surviving the practicum and meeting set requirements, but in being challenged to acquire the skills and practices of self-regulated learning and the development of adaptive expertise, an integral part of being an effective teacher. Interpretive, qualitative methodology was used to investigate the role three visiting lecturers played in the development of these skills. One of the pivotal findings emphasised the importance of the conversations that took place between the visiting lecturer, associate teacher and student teacher promoting self-regulatory practices. The incorporation of these self-regulatory skills by visiting lecturers and associate teachers, supporting student teachers and their learning should be a central part of any professional development programmes.

Keywords

Self-regulation Practicum Visiting lecturer Pre-service teacher Adaptive expertise Triadic/professional discussions Associate teacher 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand

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