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Atmospheric Emission of Mercury in Malaysia

  • Masaki Takaoka
  • Habuer
  • Naoko Yoshimoto
  • Takashi Fujimori
  • Kazuyuki Oshita
  • Nobumitsu Sakai
  • Sharifah Aishah Syed Abd Kdir
Chapter

Abstract

Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. Mercury subsequently enters the oceans, lakes, and rivers, directly as atmospheric deposition or from diffuse or concentrated sources in surrounding watersheds. Some inorganic mercury in water is converted into organic mercury, which is very toxic and subject to biological accumulation. To prevent mercury contamination, we have to control atmospheric emissions of mercury internationally. First, for the appropriate management of mercury, it is necessary to clarify the emission sources and amounts. In this study, we developed a mercury emission inventory for Malaysia by conducting a literature review, consulting with the Malaysian Ministry of the Environment, and measuring actual mercury levels in emissions from various sources. The inventory was compared to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) global mercury emission inventory and the atmospheric emissions of mercury in Japan.

Keywords

Mercury Emission Inventory Source Reduction 

Notes

Acknowledgment

We greatly appreciate the financial support provided by the Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (K113001 and 3 K143002) and the JSPS Asian Core Program “Research and Education Center for the Risk Based Asian Oriented Integrated Watershed Management.”

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaki Takaoka
    • 1
    • 2
  • Habuer
    • 1
  • Naoko Yoshimoto
    • 2
  • Takashi Fujimori
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kazuyuki Oshita
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nobumitsu Sakai
    • 2
  • Sharifah Aishah Syed Abd Kdir
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Global Ecology, Graduate School of Global Environmental StudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Chemical EngineeringUiTMShah AlamMalaysia

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