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Introduction

  • Giulia Carabelli
Chapter
Part of the The Contemporary City book series (TCONTCI)

Abstract

This chapter offers an introduction to the book, highlighting its theoretical and methodological contributions. The chapter explains how the book draws on Lefebvre’s theory of space production in innovative ways for the study of ethno-nationally divided cities. It continues by reflecting on the choice of ethnography for the study of Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and it discusses how this book challenges normalised representations of ‘divided cities’ as permanent sites of antagonistic politics to shed light on existing moments of inter- and supra-ethnic collaborations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Max Planck Institute for the Study of Ethnic and Religious DiversityGöttingenGermany

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