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The Confucian Value of Harmony in Music Education in Relation to Songs

  • Wai-Chung Ho
Chapter
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Part of the Cultural Studies and Transdisciplinarity in Education book series (CSTE, volume 7)

Abstract

This chapter will examine the interactions between social harmony and historical memory and how Confucian values shape education, focusing on the ways in which the governing politics of Mainland China have handled diversity in music education in the context of the globally oriented economics of China today. The introduction of Confucian education can be viewed, to a large extent, as illuminating some form of ideological justification in national education and music education. Through song teaching in music education, despite different focuses and dimensions, the Chinese Government has adopted the pragmatic Confucian doctrine of education, including love for the homeland, praise of parenthood, and recognition of individuals’ responsibilities to the nation, to family, and to themselves, to consolidate state power.

Keywords

Confucian values Global peace Harmonious society National and minority cultures Official songs School music education Traditional Chinese culture 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wai-Chung Ho
    • 1
  1. 1.Hong Kong Baptist UniversityKowloon TongHong Kong

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