The Learning, Use and Critical Understanding of Software in Engineering

  • Elaine Khoo
  • Craig Hight
  • Rob Torrens
  • Bronwen Cowie
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Education book series (BRIEFSEDUCAT)

Abstract

This chapter (as with Chap.  3) details the findings from a two-year funded empirical study aimed at understanding tertiary students’ development of the understandings and skills needed to use software as forms of software literacy. Two case studies were developed. A case study of engineering students’ software literacy development is the focus of this chapter. Two cohorts of students were tracked using mixed methods to explore their learning and understanding of discipline-specific software (here the Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software SolidWorks). An additional group of advanced final year CAD students were also interviewed to ascertain if there were particular nuances in their software learning experience. The findings of this case study provide insight into engineering students’ software literacy development in a specific tertiary context. A discussion of the findings including implications for what the findings might mean in relation to the wider field of software teaching and learning is addressed in Chap.  5.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elaine Khoo
    • 1
  • Craig Hight
    • 2
  • Rob Torrens
    • 3
  • Bronwen Cowie
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Education, Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research (WMIER)University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.School of Creative IndustriesThe University of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  3. 3.Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of EngineeringUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand

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