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Tangentyere Design: Architectural Practice and Cultural Agency in Central Australia

  • Andrew Broffman
Chapter

Abstract

Tangentyere Design is an Aboriginal owned architectural practice based in central Australia. As an enterprise of its parent organisation, Tangentyere Council, its mission is to promote—within the built environment—the social and cultural aspirations of Indigenous peoples. This article highlights the challenges faced by a not-for-profit entity working in a commercially competitive environment, and examines the concepts of cultural agency and social enterprise through its building projects and advocacy efforts.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Tangentyere Design has had a remarkable and resilient history. It has been supported over the decades by its owners—the town camp residents, and it has been guided by many committed architects and staff. Each has brought their own focus to the practice; and each has weathered changes in Indigenous public policy, changes within Indigenous communities themselves, and changes within the practice’s parent organisation, Tangentyere Council. Though different across time, Tangentyere’s staff has been and continues to be united by a shared and strong social conscience and a firm belief that social justice in the built environment is achievable. The contribution of each person in the journey needs to be acknowledged here. In writing this chapter, I drew on the expertise of Stephen Lumb, a former senior architect at Tangentyere Design for review. My thanks also to Julian Wigley, who was there at the beginning and willing to share his experiences of that time.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tangetyere DesignAlice SpringsAustralia

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