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Relational Leadership: New Thinking or Established Ideas in “New Clothes”

Chapter
Part of the Educational Leadership Theory book series (ELT)

Abstract

The terminology used to characterize school organization has shifted over the past 50 years, as noted by Scott Eacott. He argues that leadership has become the dominant focus of research attention in educational administration, but he adds that this is largely a change of label rather than substance. It should be noted that, in some contexts, including the UK, management supplanted administration as early as the 1980s, because administration in this context tends to denote routine processes.

Keywords

Eacott Educational Administration National College For School Leadership (NCSL) Leithwood Leadership Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of NottinghamNottinghamUK

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