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Rules of Engagement: Family Rules on Young Children’s Access to and Use of Technologies

  • Stephane Chaudron
  • Jackie Marsh
  • Verònica Donoso Navarette
  • Wannes Ribbens
  • Giovanna Mascheroni
  • David Smahel
  • Martina Cernikova
  • Michael Dreier
  • Riitta-Liisa Korkeamäki
  • Sonia Livingstone
  • Svenja Ottovordemgentschenfelde
  • Lydia Plowman
  • Ben Fletcher-Watson
  • Janice Richardson
  • Vladimir Shlyapnikov
  • Galina Soldatova
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Development book series (CHILD, volume 22)

Abstract

This chapter reports on a study conducted in seven countries in which young children’s (aged under 8) digital practices in the home were examined. The study explored family practices with regard to access to and use of technologies, tracing the ways in which families managed risks and opportunities. Seventy families participated in the study, and interviews were undertaken with both parents and children, separately and together, in order to address the research aims. This chapter focuses on the data relating to parental mediation of young children’s digital practices. Findings indicate that parents used a narrow range of strategies in comparison to parents of older children, primarily because they considered their children too young to be at risk when using technologies. However, children’s own reports suggested that some were able to access online sites independently from a young age and would have benefitted from more support and intervention. The implications of the study for future research and practice are considered.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephane Chaudron
    • 1
  • Jackie Marsh
    • 2
  • Verònica Donoso Navarette
    • 3
  • Wannes Ribbens
    • 4
  • Giovanna Mascheroni
    • 5
  • David Smahel
    • 6
  • Martina Cernikova
    • 6
  • Michael Dreier
    • 7
  • Riitta-Liisa Korkeamäki
    • 8
  • Sonia Livingstone
    • 9
  • Svenja Ottovordemgentschenfelde
    • 9
  • Lydia Plowman
    • 10
  • Ben Fletcher-Watson
    • 11
  • Janice Richardson
    • 12
  • Vladimir Shlyapnikov
    • 13
  • Galina Soldatova
    • 14
  1. 1.European Commission, Joint Research CentreIspraItaly
  2. 2.University of SheffieldSheffieldUK
  3. 3.KU LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  4. 4.Erasmus University RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Università Cattolica del Sacro CuoreMilanItaly
  6. 6.Masaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic
  7. 7.Johannes Gutenberg-UniversitätMainzGermany
  8. 8.University of OuluOuluFinland
  9. 9.London School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK
  10. 10.University of EdinburghScotlandUK
  11. 11.Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities/University of EdinburghScotlandUK
  12. 12.InsightLuxembourg CityLuxembourg
  13. 13.Moscow Institute of PsychoanalysisMoscowRussian Federation
  14. 14.Lomonosov Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussian Federation

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