Changes of the Drug Scene in Hong Kong

  • Yuet Wah Cheung
  • Nicole Wai-ting Cheung
Chapter
Part of the Quality of Life in Asia book series (QLAS, volume 11)

Abstract

This chapter traced the changes in the drug scene of Hong Kong, focusing on how the historical dominance of heroin had lost ground to psychoactive drugs, especially ketamine, among young drug users since the mid-1990s. The upsurge of psychoactive drug use in young people during the period from the mid-1990s to 2010s was explained with respect to rapid social, economic, and cultural changes that had occurred since the 1980s, as well as the normalization of recreational use thesis which has been a popular perspective on the global phenomenon of young people’s drug use at the turn of the century. Moreover, normalization in Hong Kong has been facilitated by a process of neutralization of ketamine use involving the comparison of ketamine and heroin, which is unique to young drug users in Hong Kong.

Keywords

Drug scene in Hong Kong Heroin Psychoactive drugs Ketamine Normalization of recreational drug use 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuet Wah Cheung
    • 1
  • Nicole Wai-ting Cheung
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyHong Kong Shue Yan UniversityHong KongChina
  2. 2.Department of SociologyThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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