Advertisement

Perspectives on Abuse and Neglect of the Elderly in India

  • Mala Kapur Shankardass
Chapter

Abstract

Elder abuse and neglect as social, legal and public health issues are now recognized all over the world. In India, too, elder abuse and neglect have caught the attention of researchers, social workers, academicians and policymakers, and in recent years there have been responses from various quarters attempting to understand the problems, prevent and manage them. Yet, definition of elder abuse and neglect is still discussed and contested, though in general it is accepted as a single or repeated act, or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust which causes harm or distress to an older person. Lack of mandatory reporting laws, which require certain individuals and professionals to report instances of abuse to an official agency or to the police, also add to a lack of clarity on an acceptable and universal definition of elder abuse and neglect in the country. Many studies conducted in the Indian context classify it as physical abuse, emotional or psychological abuse, financial abuse or exploitation, neglect, and sexual abuse. Recognizing the category of self-neglect is still an unknown field in India. The chapter reviews the responses in India to understand the concept in its various dimensions and suggests that there is still much more which needs to be done to prevent, detect and manage the problems, which are increasing as the population of older persons grows in the country.

References

  1. Beaulieu, Marie, Michelle Côté, Joséphine Loock, Monia D’Amours, Luisa Diaz, and Jacques Cloutier. 2018, forthcoming. The Montreal police model: Actions to counter mistreatment of older adults. In International handbook of elder abuse and mistreatment, ed. Mala Kapur Shankardass. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  2. Bakshi, P.M. 2000a. Homes for the aged—legal aspects. In Lecture series in geriatrics, health care promotion trust, ed. P.C. Bhatla, 416–417. New Delhi: National Institute of Primary Health Care.Google Scholar
  3. Bakshi, P.M. 2000b. Senior citizens and the law. In Lecture series in geriatrics, health care promotion trust, ed. P.C. Bhatla, 415. New Delhi: National Institute of Primary Health Care.Google Scholar
  4. Berkman, L., T.V. Sekher, B. Capistrant, and Y. Zheng. 2012. Social networks, family, and care giving among older adults in India. In Ageing in Asia: Findings from new and emerging data initiatives, ed. J.P. Smith, and M. Majmumdar. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.Google Scholar
  5. Glendenning, Frank, and Paul Kingston (eds.). 1999. Elder abuse and neglect in residential settings: Different national backgrounds and similar responses. Binghamton: The Haworth Maltreatment & Trauma Press.Google Scholar
  6. Lachs, M. 2010. Treat me, not my age: A doctor’s guide to getting the best care as you or our loved one gets older. New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
  7. MoSJ& E. 2011. Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, Government of India. http://socialjustice.nic.in/pdf/dnpsc.pdf.
  8. Pillemer, K., M.T. Connolly, R. Breckman, N. Spreng, and M.S. Lachs. 2015. Elder mistreatment: Priorities for consideration by the White House Conference on Aging. The Gerontologist 55 (2): 320–327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Shankardass, Mala Kapur. 2007. Maintenance and Welfare Bill, 2007 as adult protection legislation: A critical assessment’. Research and Development Journal 13 (3), HelpAge India.Google Scholar
  10. Shankardass, Mala Kapur. 2010. Elder abuse and adult protection. In Ageing and health in India, ed. C. Shanthi Johnson, and S. Irudaya Rajan. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.Google Scholar
  11. Shankardass, Mala Kapur. 2012. Combating elder abuse: Need for comprehensive right based action. The Tribune, 15 June.Google Scholar
  12. Thomas, Cynthia. 2018, forthcoming. Coordinating elder abuse prevention and treatment across organizations in the United States. In International handbook of elder abuse and mistreatment, ed. Mala Kapur Shankardass. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  13. UNFPA. 2012. Report on the status of elderly in selected states of India-2011, Building a knowledge base on population ageing in India. New Delhi: UNFPA.Google Scholar
  14. WHO. 2002. The Toronto declaration on the global prevention of elder abuse. Geneva: World Health Organisation.Google Scholar
  15. Winterstein, Tova Band, and Zvi Eisikovits. 2014. Intimate violence across the lifespan: Interpersonal, familial, and cross-generational perspectives. Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology, Maitreyi College, South CampusUniversity of DelhiNew DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations