Pollution Control by Installation of MQ-Smoke Sensors in Car Exhausts with IOT-Based Monitoring

  • Abinash Borah
  • Sandeep Jangid
  • Amisha Kumari
  • Anita Gehlot
  • Rajesh Singh
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 624)

Abstract

Installation of the smoke sensors in the car exhausts of the personal vehicles can be major step in the pollution control system through which the concentration of the smoke can be calculated with the help of a simple circuit comprising of few electronic components like LEDs, buzzers. Various methods came into action to calculate the release of the CO2, SO2 gases with the help of individual sensors. But here, we are using only a single sensor for this, a few electronic components, and GSM module for transmission and IOT. This will keep a regular check of pollution level in individual automobile on a daily basis and set a limit of smoke emission for a particular vehicle and will play a major role in pollution control. The installation of this device will be made compulsory in the near future when the manufacturing of the automobile takes place, thus reducing the risk of pollution. Our system will also increase the use of public vehicles which is again a beneficiary factor for the pollution levels to reduce.

Keywords

IOT-based pollution monitoring MQ2 sensors in car exhausts Pollution control using sensors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abinash Borah
    • 1
  • Sandeep Jangid
    • 1
  • Amisha Kumari
    • 1
  • Anita Gehlot
    • 1
  • Rajesh Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronics Instrumentation and Control Engineering Department, College of Engineering StudiesUniversity of Petroleum and Energy StudiesDehradunIndia

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