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Allergy and Pollen

  • Jae-Won Oh
Chapter

Abstract

The understanding of allergy is growing exponentially with the ongoing expansion in our knowledge of the immune system. The immune system is the capacity to distinguish harmful non-self molecules from self-molecules, a characteristic that exists in a delicate balance between tolerance to self and response or rejection of non-self. This system is focused on host defense and is composed of specific cellular and protein components that develop and function in a highly complex manner, in order to neutralize or destroy dangerous non-self while preserving self.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jae-Won Oh
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of PediatricsHanyang University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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