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Introduction: Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Realities in Education

Part of the Smart Computing and Intelligence book series (SMCOMINT)

Abstract

This introductory chapter provides an overview of the major media used for immersive learning: virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality. The origin of this book is described, and a brief history of immersive media in education is presented. A detailed conceptual framework articulates the ways in which immersive media are powerful for learning. The chapter concludes with a description of each subsequent chapter in the volume.

Keywords

  • Virtual reality
  • Augmented reality
  • Mixed reality
  • Augmented virtuality
  • Virtual environment
  • VR
  • AR
  • MR
  • VE
  • Cyberspace
  • Immersion
  • Presence
  • Haptics
  • Constructivism
  • Situated learning
  • Active learning
  • Constructionism
  • Education
  • Schools
  • Museums
  • Informal education
  • Conceptual change
  • Adaptive response
  • Metaverse
  • 360 video
  • HMD
  • CAVE
  • Dome
  • Cybersickness
  • Sensory conflict
  • Interactive
  • Interactivity
  • Multiuser virtual environment
  • MUVE
  • Massively multiple online roleplaying game
  • MMORPG
  • MMO
  • Avatar
  • Panoramic
  • Oculus rift
  • HTC vive
  • Google cardboard
  • GearVR
  • 3D

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Acknowledgements

The editors, authors, and workshop participants are grateful for the financial support provided by NetDragon Websoft.

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Correspondence to Christopher J. Dede .

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Dede, C.J., Jacobson, J., Richards, J. (2017). Introduction: Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Realities in Education. In: Liu, D., Dede, C., Huang, R., Richards, J. (eds) Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Realities in Education. Smart Computing and Intelligence. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5490-7_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5490-7_1

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-10-5489-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-10-5490-7

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