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Spicing Up the Experience: Rethinking Street-Food in Bandung Tourism

Conference paper
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Abstract

The number of street-food grows rapidly along with the flow of massive migrants into Bandung City. In accordance, the easy access into the city allows tourism industries to thrive largely and encourage people to have spots to escape from daily routines. By offering the diversity, the industry can persuade tourists to discover hidden gems of the city and present it as a valued object or leisure activity. This paper suggests the informal life of street vending that represents open, humble, and modest value, becoming a potency to fulfill tourism needs. This paper brings forward a finding gained from an ethnographic research on street vending activities in Bandung. At the end, this writing tries to contribute to a perspective toward street-food, as an economic activity phenomenon, in the realm of the tourism industry.

Keywords

Street vendor Tourism Food culture Bandung Indonesia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Human and Socio-Environmental StudiesKanazawaJapan

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