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On Competing Risks with Masked Failures

  • Isha Dewan
  • Uttara Naik-Nimbalkar
Chapter

Abstract

Competing risks data arise when the study units are exposed to several risks at the same time but it is assumed that the eventual failure of a unit is due to only one of these risks, which is called the “cause of failure”. Statistical inference procedures when the time to failure and the cause of failure are observed for each unit are well documented. In some applications, it is possible that the cause of failure is either missing or masked for some units. In this article, we review some statistical inference procedures used when the cause of failure is missing or masked for some units.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Prof. J. V. Deshpande and Prof. Sangita Kulathinal for several fruitful discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Theoretical Statistics and Mathematics UnitIndian Statistical InstituteNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Department of MathematicsIndian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER)PuneIndia

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