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Current trends in Electronic Family Resilience Tools: Implementing a tool for the cancer domain

  • Eleni Kazantzaki
  • Lefteris Koumakis
  • Haridimos Kondylakis
  • Chiara Renzi
  • Chiara Fioretti
  • Ketti Mazzocco
  • Kostas Marias
  • Manolis Tsiknakis
  • Gabriella Pravettoni
Conference paper
Part of the IFMBE Proceedings book series (IFMBE, volume 65)

Abstract

It is well documented that the diagnosis of cancer affects the wellbeing of the whole family adding overwhelming stresses and uncertainties. As such, family education and enhancement of resilience is an important factor that should be promoted and facilitated in a holistic manner for addressing a severe and chronic condition such as cancer. In this paper, we review the notion of resilience in the literature identifying three tools that try to support it. Then we focus in the cancer domain and we describe a tool implemented to this direction. To our knowledge, this is the first time such a tool is used to complete patient profile with family resilience information, eventually leading to patient and family engagement and empowerment.

Keywords

Personal Health Record Patient Empowerment Military Family Family Engagement Family Resilience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eleni Kazantzaki
    • 1
  • Lefteris Koumakis
    • 1
  • Haridimos Kondylakis
    • 1
  • Chiara Renzi
    • 2
  • Chiara Fioretti
    • 2
  • Ketti Mazzocco
    • 2
  • Kostas Marias
    • 1
    • 3
  • Manolis Tsiknakis
    • 1
    • 3
  • Gabriella Pravettoni
    • 2
  1. 1.Computational BioMedicine Laboratory (CBML), FORTH-ICSHeraklion, CreteGreece
  2. 2.Applied Research Division for Cognitive and Psychological ScienceEuropean Institute of OncologyMilanItaly
  3. 3.Department of Informatics EngineeringTechnological Educational Institute of CreteHeraklionGreece

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