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What Students Want Within School Playgrounds to Be Active and Healthy

Abstract

It has been revealed that the design of school playground facilities often results from parent/teacher collaboration and from principal decisions . Reliance on adults in the design and planning of students’ playground activity environments can lead to undesired settings that can have long-term consequences for students’ social and emotional development. In addition, students may believe they have little influence on the set-up of their school playground for desired activities . Students’ perceptions are an important consideration for researchers , teachers and schools when planning school playground environments for activities. Despite students generally being the main consumers of such environments during sport , health , physical education and non-curricular periods, adults are often the decision makers when planning school physical activity environments. This chapter will outline a range of recommendations put forward by both primary and secondary school students.

Keywords

  • Student-centred
  • Physical activity
  • Playgrounds
  • Perceptions

‘It is important that students perceive they have an influence on the set-up or school playgrounds to engage in desired activities

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Correspondence to Brendon Hyndman .

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Hyndman, B. (2017). What Students Want Within School Playgrounds to Be Active and Healthy. In: Hyndman, B. (eds) Contemporary School Playground Strategies for Healthy Students. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4738-1_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4738-1_10

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