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Indonesia in the Asia Pacific Energy Market

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Abstract

Asia Pacific region will continue playing an important role in the global energy market. It can be indicated not only in the increase in energy consumption and the growing population, but also its rapid economic development in the region. However, the increasing energy demand in the Asia Pacific is heavily on fossil-based energy resources. Through examining five countries in the region, this chapter aims to scrutinize the energy situation of each countries and how their needs on energy lead to cooperation and conflict . It finds that the increasing roles of the Asia Pacific countries, being consumers, producers, importers, and exporters for these energy sources, means that their presence in the world energy market is of high importance. Their involvements will eventually affect not only the availability and stability of the world energy prices, but also the opportunities for cooperation and competition among them. The common interests for energy supply security become a strong reason for the countries to have cooperation rather than competition or conflict.

Keywords

  • Asia pacific
  • Energy market
  • Energy consumption
  • Energy production

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Excluding countries in North America, South America, Europe, and Eurasia.

  2. 2.

    According to the BP report, the Middle East includes Saudi Arabia , Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. South and Central America includes the Caribbean (including Puerto Rico), Central and South America. Europe and Eurasia include European countries (OECD member countries plus Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Macedonia, Gibraltar, Malta, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovenia) and the former colony of the Soviet Union. Africa includes North Africa (extending from Egypt to the Western Sahara), West Africa (extending from Mauritania to Angola , including Cape Verde and Chad), Eastern and Southern Africa (extending from Sudan to South Africa, including Botswana, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe). North America includes the United States (except Puerto Rico), Canada, and Mexico. Asia Pacific includes Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan , Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India , Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka), South Korea , Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Australasia (Australia, New Zealand), Papua New Guinea, and Oceania.

  3. 3.

    Historically, the upstream sector, which includes exploration and production, became one of the most profitable oil businesses. The activities include the pursuit of profits through rents resulting from oil production costs and the final oil price in the international market.

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Correspondence to Athiqah Nur Alami .

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Alami, A.N. (2017). Indonesia in the Asia Pacific Energy Market. In: Foreign Policy and Energy Security Issues in Indonesia . Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4421-2_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4421-2_4

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