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Abstract

Companion planting is a knowledge-based strategy which involves growing of several crops (crop diversity) to achieve economizing on space, balanced nutrition, habitat management to enhance natural enemies, and increase productivity, besides the management of biotic stresses, such as insect pests, disease pathogens, nematodes, and weeds. These benefits could include providing cover for shade-loving plants, repelling harmful insects, attracting beneficial insects, or providing necessary soil requirements for other plants. Companion plants repel pests, camouflage their odor, enrich the soil by fixing nitrogen, disorient the adult pests, attract beneficials, suppress weeds, deter and kill root nematodes, protect soil moisture, and act as trap plants, and their root exudates prevent soil-borne pathogens. Management of various pests infesting several crop plants using companion planting technology is discussed in this chapter.

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Reddy, P.P. (2017). Companion Planting. In: Agro-ecological Approaches to Pest Management for Sustainable Agriculture. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4325-3_10

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