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Heat Health Risks

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Part of the IHDP/Future Earth-Integrated Risk Governance Project Series book series (IHDP-FEIRG)

Abstract

High temperature is a natural hazard linking with excess mortality and morbidity (Kovats and Hajat 2008). High temperature can induce heat stroke, communicable disease, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory disease (Basu and Ostro 2008; Hajat et al. 2005).

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-981-10-4199-0_3
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Fig. 3.1

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Correspondence to Xinchuang Xu .

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Xu, X., Ge, Q., Liu, X. (2018). Heat Health Risks. In: Tang, Q., Ge, Q. (eds) Atlas of Environmental Risks Facing China Under Climate Change. IHDP/Future Earth-Integrated Risk Governance Project Series. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4199-0_3

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