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Reconsideration of Ouija Board Motion in Terms of Haptics Illusions (II)—Development of a 1-DoF Linear Rail Device

Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE,volume 432)

Abstract

The Ouija board is a game associated with involuntary motion called ideomotor action. Our goal is to clarify the conditions under which Ouija board motion occurs, comparing visual, force, and vibrotactile cues. In this paper, we demonstrated a newly developed 1-degree of freedom (DoF) Linear Rail Device, which we used to study these ideomotor actions with less friction and inertia.

Keywords

  • Ideomotor action
  • Pseudo haptics
  • 1-DoF linear rail device ouija board

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15H05923 (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas, “Innovative SHITSUKSAN Science and Technology”).

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Correspondence to Takahiro Shitara .

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Shitara, T., Nakai, Y., Uematsu, H., Yem, V., Kajimoto, H., Saga, S. (2018). Reconsideration of Ouija Board Motion in Terms of Haptics Illusions (II)—Development of a 1-DoF Linear Rail Device. In: Hasegawa, S., Konyo, M., Kyung, KU., Nojima, T., Kajimoto, H. (eds) Haptic Interaction. AsiaHaptics 2016. Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering, vol 432. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4157-0_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4157-0_1

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