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Introduction

  • Ali Alsamawi
  • Darian McBain
  • Joy Murray
  • Manfred Lenzen
  • Kirsten S. Wiebe
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Footprints and Eco-design of Products and Processes book series (EFEPP)

Abstract

In 2008, the volume of international trade reached more than 16 trillion USD worldwide. These are basically monetary transactions between sellers and buyers of products. Linked to each monetary transaction involving products crossing international borders, there are associated emissions and social consequences. This chapter provides a brief introduction to the history of international trade and links to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Supply Chain International Trade Saudi Arabia Fair Trade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ali Alsamawi
    • 1
  • Darian McBain
    • 2
  • Joy Murray
    • 1
  • Manfred Lenzen
    • 1
  • Kirsten S. Wiebe
    • 3
  1. 1.School of PhysicsUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Sustainable DevelopmentThai Union GroupBangkokThailand
  3. 3.Department of Energy and Process EngineeringNorwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheimNorway

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