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Perceptions of Impoliteness from a Cultural Linguistics Perspective

Part of the Cultural Linguistics book series (CL)

Abstract

This chapter explores the role of ‘culture’ in perceptions of impoliteness from a Cultural Linguistics perspective. Recent studies of impoliteness have identified a number of factors that influence speakers’ perception of (im)polite language use. The chapter argues that Cultural Linguistics has the potential to offer a robust analytical framework for the exploration of the cultural conceptualisations that are often associated with (im)polite use of language. The framework provides a set of analytical tools for bringing to the foreground features of human languages that are entrenched in cultural conceptualisations, including cultural schemas, cultural categories, and cultural metaphors. This chapter elaborates on this proposal by presenting examples of naturalistic discourse from Persian in which speakers interpret impolite behaviour in the light of a number of Persian cultural schemas. The study reported in this chapter also adopts a novel three-layered approach that combines (meta)discourse analysis with the ethnography of cultural conceptualisations for data analysis.

Keywords

  • Impoliteness
  • Culture
  • Cultural linguistics
  • Persian
  • Conceptualisation

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Fig. 18.1
Fig. 18.2

Notes

  1. 1.

    e is the spoken form for ast ‘is’.

  2. 2.

    In excerpts, the English sentences are pragmatic approximations and not morpheme-to-morpheme glosses.

  3. 3.

    The speaker draws on the schema of sharmandegi and uses the term ‘sharmandam’ (lit. I am ashamed) to say he is sorry.

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Correspondence to Tahmineh Tayebi .

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Sharifian, F., Tayebi, T. (2017). Perceptions of Impoliteness from a Cultural Linguistics Perspective. In: Sharifian, F. (eds) Advances in Cultural Linguistics. Cultural Linguistics. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-4056-6_18

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