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The Study of the Relationship Between Internet Addiction and Depression Amongst Students of University of Namibia

  • Poonam Dhaka
  • Atty Mwafufya
  • Hilma Mbandeka
  • Iani de Kock
  • Manfred Janik
  • Dharm Singh Jat
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS, volume 10)

Abstract

The aim of this preliminary study was to explore the impact of Internet usage on individual functioning by exploring the relationship between Internet usage and depression amongst the students of University of Namibia. An exploratory study was conducted amongst 36 conveniently selected males and females’ students. This study investigated prevalence of internet addiction and its association with depression. In this study two tests were used, the Young Internet Addiction Test (YIAT) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The males scored an average of 36.6 on the YIAT whilst females scored an average of 33.9. On the PHQ-9, the males scored 14.7 and females scored 16 on average. The differences in hours spend per day for females were 4.5 h and males spend 6.4 on average. The result of this exploratory study reveals that there is a correlation between Internet addiction scores, depression scores and time spent online.

Keywords

Internet addiction Depression Internet usage Social networks 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Poonam Dhaka
    • 1
  • Atty Mwafufya
    • 1
  • Hilma Mbandeka
    • 1
  • Iani de Kock
    • 1
  • Manfred Janik
    • 1
  • Dharm Singh Jat
    • 2
  1. 1.University of NamibiaWindhoekNamibia
  2. 2.Namibia University of Science and TechnologyWindhoekNamibia

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