Skip to main content

Mapping Leisure in the Philippines

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Mapping Leisure
  • 358 Accesses

Abstract

On 14 July 2011, the cinemas of several large shopping malls in the Philippines stayed open to show the second instalment of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, which was being released simultaneously throughout the world. Despite the late hour, people lined up and watched in order to be one of the first people in the world to see the film, not just in the country, but, owing to the Philippines’ advanced time zone, also throughout the world. Though they may not have consciously thought it at the time, their participation in a midnight screening of a blockbuster movie like the eighth, and final, Harry Potter film was a form of participation in a leisure activity that would occur at a global scale. In a small way, they were thus participating in globalization, since fans throughout the world would be doing the same. In addition, it is global trade and consumption, and the transportation and information networks that they rely on, that have allowed the popularity of a cultural product like Harry Potter.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at large: cultural dimensions of globalization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barber, B. (1996). Jihad versus McWorld. New York: Times Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bartholomew, R. (2010). Pacific Rims: Beermen Ballin’ in flip-flops and the Philippines’ unlikely love affair with basketball. New York: New American Library.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bowring, J. (1963). A visit to the Philippine Islands. Manila: Filipiniana Book Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carpenter, F. (1929). Through the Philippines and Hawaii. New York: Doubleday, Doran and Company Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  • De la Costa, H. (1965). The background of nationalism and other essays. Manila: Solidaridad Publishing House.

    Google Scholar 

  • De Zengotita, T. (2005). Mediated. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Deocampo, N. (2003). Cine: Spanish influences on early cinema in the Philippines. Philippines: National Commission for the Culture and the Arts.

    Google Scholar 

  • Foreman, J. (1985). The Philippine Islands. Manila: Cacho Hermanos Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gelinas, J. (2003). Juggernaut politics. understanding predatory globalization. London and New York: Zed Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Giddens, A. (1990). The consequences of modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gunter, B., & Gunter, N. (1980). Leisure styles: A conceptual framework for modern leisure. The Sociological Quarterly, 21(3), 361–374.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jagor, F. (1965). Travels in the Philippines. Manila: Filipiniana Book Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Korten, D., & Klauss, R. (Eds.). (1984). People centered development: Contributions toward theory and planning frameworks. Connecticut: Kumarian Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kramer, P. (2006). The blood of government: Race, empire, the United States and the Philippines. USA: University of North Carolina Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lumbera, B. (1983). Problems in Philippine film history. In R. Guerrero (Ed.), Readings in Philippine cinema. Experimental Cinema of the Philippines: Quezon City.

    Google Scholar 

  • MacMicking, R. (1967). Recollections of Manilla and the Philippines. Manila: Filipiniana Book Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marche, A. (1970). Luzon and Palawan. Manila: Filipiniana Book Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marryat, F. (1974). Borneo and the Archipelago. In Travel accounts of the Philippines. Manila: Filipiniana Book Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Martin, P. (1983). The ‘silent pictures’ era in the Philippines. In R. Guerrero (Ed.), Readings in Philippine cinema. Experimental Cinema of the Philippines: Quezon City.

    Google Scholar 

  • Miller, D. (2008). Stuff. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nadal, K. (2011). Filipino American psychology: A handbook of theory, research and clinical practice. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Nagasaka, I. (2007). Cellphones in the rural Philippines. In R. Pertierra (Ed.), The social construction and usage of communication technologies. Manila: University of the Philippines Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Parker, S. (1975). The sociology of leisure: Progress and problems. The British Journal of Sociology, 26(1), 91–101.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Pertierra, R. (2002). Txt-ing selves: Cellphones and Philippine modernity. Manila: De La Salle University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Peterson, R. (1981). Measuring culture, leisure and time use. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 453, 169–179.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Pilar, S. (1983). The early movies. In R. Guerrero (Ed.), Readings in Philippine cinema. Experimental Cinema of the Philippines: Quezon City.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pope, S. (1995). An army of athletes: playing fields, battlefields, and the American Military Sporting Experience, 1890–1920. The Journal of Military History, 59(3), 435–456.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Robertson, J. (1913). Notes from the Philippines. The Journal of Race Development, 3(4), 467–490.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Stevens, J. E. (1899). Yesterdays in the Philippines. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stevens, J. E. (1968). Yesterdays in the Philippines. In The Philippines circa 1900. Manila: Filipiniana Book Guild.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stoodley, B. (1957). Some aspects of tagalog family structure. American Anthropologist, 59(2), 236–249.

    Google Scholar 

  • Summers, J. (1998). Listening for Historic Manila: Music and rejoicing in an international city. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture, 2(1): 203–254.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sumsky, V. (1992). The city as political actor: Manila, February 1986. Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, 17(4): 479–492.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tannert, C. (1996). Ultramar. Vienna: Angelina R. Banke.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thomas, A. (2005). Imagin-nations and borderless television: media, culture and politics across Asia. London: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Valdez, V. (2004). Philippines. In W. V. Busch (Ed.), The Asia Media Directory. Konrad Adenauer Foundation: Singapore.

    Google Scholar 

  • Veblen, T. (1953). The theory of the leisure class: An Economic Study of Institutions. New York: New American Library.

    Google Scholar 

  • Waters, M. (2001). Globalization. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, J. (1980). Sociology of leisure. Annual Review of Sociology, 6, 21–40.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Zialcita, F. (2005). Authentic though not exotic: Essays on Filipino identity. Manila: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2018 The Editor(s)

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Enverga, M. (2018). Mapping Leisure in the Philippines. In: Modi, I., Kamphorst, T. (eds) Mapping Leisure. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-3632-3_11

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-3632-3_11

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Singapore

  • Print ISBN: 978-981-10-3631-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-981-10-3632-3

  • eBook Packages: Social SciencesSocial Sciences (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics