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Reflective Practice: Ancient Wisdom and Practice—Australian Indigenous Reflections in Teacher Education Through Shared Storying

Part of the Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP,volume 17)

Abstract

The one thing that all Australians, or people living in Australia, have in common is that they walk in Aboriginal Countrys every day. Countrys that, when respected, seen and read appropriately, when listened to and heard, when felt, teach us about our interconnectedness to everything around us. In this chapter, where we craft and use a notation that is reflective of Australian Indigenous Knowings, we Story the power of reflective practice when engaging with how we live in Country. Reflection is an ancient wisdom inherent in Indigenous Knowings. Our reflective practice embraces our connections with the world, our ability to live as part of the world, rather than distinct from it. Our world and our world view privileges Indigenous Knowings showcased here through the construct of Lilyology. In this chapter we Story our shared experiences as Aboriginal practitioners, as Aboriginal academics engaging with pre-service teachers in Australia, in the hope that we can respond to the question “How can we speak to those non-Indigenous people who are only beginning to understand Australian Indigenous concepts of Country?

Keywords

  • Sweet Potato
  • Torres Strait Islander
  • Reflective Practice
  • Indigenous Woman
  • Water Lily

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 4.1

Notes

  1. 1.

    “Country refers to lands, and waters, ecosystems of both and the world of the skies above us. Country/Countrys is the term we have chosen to use to describe Aboriginal Countrys, spaces and places. It is capitalised and pluralised to give respect to our diversity. The term Country embodies ecological systems that are so much a part of Indigenous Knowings ; it is not just limited to geographical space and place. We have chosen to spell the plural differently to embrace distinctness of concept” (Blair 2015a, p. xv).

  2. 2.

    “We have chosen to use the term Story/Storys to reflect and show respect for Indigenous diversity and Knowing of the concept of Story. The spelling of the plural—Storys—reflects cultural distinctness of the concept” (Blair 2015a p. xv).

  3. 3.

    Storying is used here as a verb and embodies Indigenous Story telling from an Indigenous context and centre.

  4. 4.

    We have used the term Indigenous Knowings throughout this text to identify Indigenous knowledge as something different and distinct to Western Knowledge . “The word Knowing is capitalised and pluralised to reflect and respect diversity across Indigenous Countrys ” (Blair 2015a, p. xv).

  5. 5.

    We have chosen to write in first person as this showcases our subjectivity an essential element of Indigenous research methodologies.

  6. 6.

    A totem is a part of very complex Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kinship systems which acknowledge “every part of Country is alive”, being a form of ordering the world (Kwaymullina and Kwaymullina 2010). In this instance, We are referring to the personal totem of one of the authors. For further information, go to http://sydney.edu.au/kinship-module/learning/4-totems.shtml a Kinship Module developed by Lynn Riley 2016.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge Countrys we come from and have walked as well as the spirits of the ancestors of these Countrys both for their guidance and wisdom. We acknowledge our friend who walked Mt. Kincumba with us.

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Correspondence to Nerida Blair .

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Blair, N., Collins-Gearing, B. (2017). Reflective Practice: Ancient Wisdom and Practice—Australian Indigenous Reflections in Teacher Education Through Shared Storying. In: Brandenburg, R., Glasswell, K., Jones, M., Ryan, J. (eds) Reflective Theory and Practice in Teacher Education. Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices, vol 17. Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-3431-2_4

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