Advertisement

Wittgenstein and Philosophy of Education: A Feminist Re-assessment

Chapter

Abstract

In the last two decades, feminist readings of Wittgenstein have produced a considerable body of work. Starting from a discussion of the challenges such endeavors meet with at a first glance, the paper will argue that these new interpretations not only prove productive with regard to our reading of Wittgenstein and feminist philosophy but can also inspire new approaches for philosophy of education . Bringing Wittgenstein into dialogue with feminist standpoint epistemology in different variations provides an interesting third path between the postmodernist rejection of objectivity and the empiricists’ defense of a narrow concept of objectivity. Furthermore, with Wittgenstein’s notion of language games, family resemblances , and aspect dawning, we can arrive at an understanding of feminist educational philosophy which turns from essentialist, foundationalist understandings to a more fluid, playful conception without losing sight of the importance of theory for the continuous renewal of our everyday educational practices .

Keywords

Wittgenstein Feminism Education Ordinary language philosophy 

References

  1. Ahmed, S. (2010). The promise of happiness. Durham/London: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Butler, J. (1990). Gender trouble: Feminism and the subversion of identity. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Cavell, S. (1999). The claim of reason. New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Cohen, D. (2002). Tractatio logico-philosophica: Engendering Wittgenstein’s tractatus. In N. Scheman & P. O’Connor (Eds.), Feminist interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein (pp. 138–158). University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Crary, A. (2000). Wittgenstein’s philosophy in relation to political thought. In A. Crary & R. Read (Eds.), The new Wittgenstein (pp. 118–145). London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  6. Crary, A. (2007). Beyond moral judgment. Cambridge, MA/London, UK: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Haraway, D. J. (1991). A cyborg manifesto: Science, technology, and socialist-feminism. In Simians, cyborgs and women: The reinvention of nature (pp. 149–181). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. Harding, S. (1991). Whose science? Whose knowledge? Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Hartsock, N. (1998). The feminist standpoint revisited and other essays. Boulder, CO: Westview.Google Scholar
  10. Hekman, S. (1995). Moral voices, moral selves. Carol Gilligan and feminist moral theory. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  11. Laugier, S. (2015). The ethics of care as a politics of the ordinary. New Literary History, 46(2), 217–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Moi, T. (2006). ‘I am not a feminist, but…’: How feminism became the f-word. PMLA, 121(5), 1735–1741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Moi, T. (2015). Thinking through examples: What ordinary language philosophy can do for feminist theory. New Literary History, 46(2), 191–216.Google Scholar
  14. Nelson, H. L. (2002). Wittgenstein meets ‘woman’ in the language-game of theorizing feminism. In N. Scheman & P. O’Connor (Eds.), Feminist interpretations of Ludwig Wittgenstein (pp. 213–234). University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Scheman, N. (1996). Forms of life. Mapping the rough ground. In H. Sluga & D. G. Stern (Eds.), The Cambridge companion to Wittgenstein (pp. 383–410). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Stickney, J. A. (2014). Wittgenstein for adolescents? Post-foundational epistemology in high school philosophy. Ethics and Education, 9(2), 201–219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Tanesini, A. (2004). Wittgenstein. A feminist interpretation. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  18. Wittgenstein, L. (1956). Remarks on the foundation of mathematics (G. E. M. Anscombe, Trans.). Oxford: Basil Blackwell (RFM).Google Scholar
  19. Wittgenstein, L. (1967). Zettel (G. E. M. Anscombe, Trans.). Oxford: Basil Blackwell (Z§).Google Scholar
  20. Wittgenstein, L. (1968). Philosophical investigations (3rd ed., G. E. M. Anscombe, Trans.). Oxford: Basil Blackwell (PI§).Google Scholar
  21. Wittgenstein, L. (1977). On certainty (G. E. M. Anscombe & D. Paul, Trans.). Oxford: Basil Blackwell (OC§).Google Scholar
  22. Wittgenstein, L. (1980). Culture and value. (G. H. von Wright Ed., in collaboration with H. Nyman and P. Winch, Trans.). Oxford: Basil Blackwell (CV).Google Scholar
  23. Zerilli, L. M. G. (2005). Feminism and the abyss of freedom. Chicago/London: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  24. Zerilli, L. M. G. (2015). The turn to affect and the problem of judgment. New Literary History, 46(2), 261–286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden

Personalised recommendations