Journeys with Wittgenstein: Assembling Sketches of a Philosophical Landscape

Chapter

Abstract

In this introductory chapter, the co-editors, Jeff Stickney and Michael Peters, first survey the background of Wittgenstein scholarship in philosophy of education. Their hope is that these snapshots of earlier writers, movements and themes in the literature will provide context for better receiving the wide array of work contributed to the present volume. As a qualifier, the authors note that the review of this previous literature is not comprehensive but sufficiently complete to assist in the appreciation of how we have come to where we are today, seeing also in this family history the earlier contributions of some of our more distinguished authors in the book. The second section of the Introduction then provides an overview of the organization of the book into its other four parts, summarizing briefly the chapters we have gathered and continuing to link some of the themes or topics to previous literature on Wittgenstein and education.

Keywords

Wittgenstein Liberal-analytic philosophy of education Therapeutic readings Relativism Post-foundationalism Theory of mind Non-essentialism 

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Waikato UniversityHamiltonNew Zealand
  3. 3.University of IllinoisChampaignUSA

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