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Three Misunderstandings for Design of Negative Pressure Ward

  • Zhonglin XuEmail author
  • Bin Zhou
Chapter

Abstract

With the severe situation for the appearance of SARS and the fear for the resultant consequence, at the early stage of the outbreak event wards were reconstructed with a simple way. Newly constructed isolation wards were designed according to related literatures issued by CDC in 1994, and the corresponding requirements were elevated blindly. In literatures, the technical measures related to negative pressure isolation ward was inclined to adopt high negative pressure, air-tight door and all fresh air, where it was considered safe only to increase the negative pressure as high as possible, to install air-tight door without infiltration air and to provide all fresh air.

Keywords

Temperature Difference Pressure Difference Negative Pressure Door Opening Intake Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.China Academy of Building ResearchBeijingChina
  2. 2.Nanjing Tech UniversityNanjingChina

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