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Teaching Bioethics: The Intersection of Values and the Applications that Advances in Technology Make Possible

  • Deborah Stevens
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Issues in Technology Education book series (CITE)

Abstract

This chapter summarises research that shows that in teaching bioethics, student-centred, narrative- and discussion-based pedagogy was critical to achieving specified outcomes. These outcomes included development of technological and scientific conceptual understanding, values appreciation, critical thinking, philosophical argument and improved skills of relating to others, managing self and participating and contributing. Students achieved these outcomes regardless of their academic history.

Keywords

Movie Clip Bioethical Issue Academic Vocabulary International Curriculum Case Study Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Bibliography

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For Further Reading

  1. Jones, A., McKim, A., & Reiss, M. (2010). Towards introducing ethical thinking in the classroom: Beyond rhetoric. In A. Jones, A. McKim, & M. Reiss (Eds.), Ethics in the science and technology classroom (pp. 1–5). Rotterdam: Sense Publications.Google Scholar
  2. Macer, D. (2008). Moral games for teaching bioethics. Haifa: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizations Chair in Bioethics Office.Google Scholar
  3. Willmott, C., & Willis, D. (2008). The increasing significance of ethics in the bioscience curriculum. Journal of Biological Education, 42(3), 99–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Zeidler, D. L., Sadler, T. D., Applebaum, S., & Callahan, B. E. (2009). Advancing reflective judgement through socioscientific issues. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 74–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand

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